Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

About Us

The NHS Clinical Leaders Network (CLN) was formed in 2005 in response to the widely acknowledged national need to develop and sustain a source of local clinical champions who in turn will act as agents of change.

Now in its 15th year, the NHS CLN is an established professional network for all frontline practicing clinicians, care providers, care leaders and clinical leaders across England, enabling them to develop professionally and personally as well as support and develop large scale transformational change across health & social care.

The NHS CLN aims to be a nexus between frontline leadership, policy makers and national decision makers with the purpose of developing shared leadership to meet the NHS strategic vision. A strategic partner that supports innovation, defines best practice and enables standardisation delivering the best outcomes.

Open to a variety of professionals from within the healthcare sector, the CLN strives to:

  • Empower frontline clinicians
  • Develop clinical leaders
  • Influence health policy
  • Improve quality and productivity
  • Deliver patient centered services
  • Promote shared leadership with system managers

These above objectives are met by way of a structured programme of service improvement which is based upon regular action learning; allowing our members the opportunity to actively debate concerns, undertake problem solving and plan practical action that will improve the quality of their care services.

It has many benefits with the hope that together, the network can bring about real change and improvement to patient experience and service delivery at a local, regional and national levels.

CLN Board Members include: 

  • Dr Andy Coley, Chief Clinical Officer 
  • Dr Raj Kumar, National Chair 
  • David Rowlands, Regional Chair: North 
  • David Davis: Regional Chair: South 
  • Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer
  • Yvonne Chadwick, National Programme Manager